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Zippered Jib


BarryK1200LT
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Does anyone run a zippered jib on their Maricat?

Mines the original jib with the stay wire running through it, and you have to attach the jib to the mast prior to stepping the mast into position.

I never seem to get enough tension on the leading edge of my jib, and as a result teh jib won't set nicely. I also find the trailing edge "flaps" like crazy in stroger winds, and I have to pull teh jib on that "tight" to stop the flapping that I choke the gap between the jib and the main, and then loose a lot of power.

I've been considering having a new jib made that would zipper onto the front stay (sloop rig), and set up its own halyard to pull the jib up the stay wire, and then tension the jib off by running the halyard rope through small block and cleat in much the same way my Nacra Jib is set up.

Anyone done this on a Maricat, and found the jib sets better than the standard setup?, and would it be class legal so long as the jib was still the same size as the original jib?

Cheers

Barry

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There are a couple of zipper jibs around, Exodus and 50/50 have them. Scott on 50/50 had a new one made this year and I don't think he is happy with it. It is complicated and untidy. Most Maricats run with the so called original jib. The problem sounds like the cut of the jib and maybe the sheeting position. Do you run forestays as well ? If so take them off or leave them slack and take all the tension on the forestay (inside the jib. If the trailing edge still flaps try moving the sheeting position forward. If you draw a straight line up the jib sheet it should be about one third of the way up the jib. Does the jib have a leech line (a cord which runs down the trailing edge). If so pull it tighter. If all else fails then maybe the jib is blown out and may need a recut or replacement. If the jib is cut and set right then pulling the jib on tight in strong wind is not a problem.

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Although a little more technical than needed, correct way to assess Headsail sheeting is:

find centre of effort of jib (mathematical equation I can find if needed) draw a line from this point through the clew and where that line intersects the deck gives you your fore n aft position for your blocks. Slot width has many determinates. Looking at the slot usually gives you an idea. The two lines created by the main leech and jib leech (viewed from aft) should have the same arc ie part of the same circle. If when your arc looks about right and you have found the correct fore n aft position you find you have to alter positions more than a small amount your headsail is probably stretched. The hardest part is always getting the slot right not the fore n aft position.

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The jib needs more tension on the roach. You do not have enough downward tension. Check sheeting position or sort it with a roach cord.

But first sort out the tension in the luff. It is possible that the jib has losened on the wire.

So no matter how tight you have the wire, the jib is still loose. Check attachment at both ends. Do this first as it may fix your other problem at the same time.

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Aka FiftyFifty. Yes, I was unhappy with the jib when first got it but since I have had the new boat and set it up properly with the new system it has worked well and I am very happy with it. The main reason for getting the zipper jib was for when we went away sailing I can take the jib down at the end of the day. You are all quite welcome to have a look at how it works and have a test sail at Tanilba Bay at any time.

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Originally posted by warbird:

The jib needs more tension on the roach. You do not have enough downward tension. Check sheeting position or sort it with a roach cord.

But first sort out the tension in the luff. It is possible that the jib has losened on the wire.

So no matter how tight you have the wire, the jib is still loose. Check attachment at both ends. Do this first as it may fix your other problem at the same time.

Thanks Warbird (and everyone else),

I think there is a good chance that the jib luff tension may be a large part of my jib problems. No matter how much tension I get on the wire, the leading edge of the jib sheet always appears to be looser than it should be, and I get this odd 1" to 2" curl at the very front of the jib sheet that I can't get out unless I really pull the jib on tight, which then chokes the slot between the jib and main.

I'll have a closer look at how my jib sheet is tensioned next time I rig the boat, and try more tension on the luff to see if that improves the way the jib sets.

Thanks for all the advice.

Cheers

Barry

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Barry, if you have a vertical curl at the luff it indicates to much tension on the sail, not the forestay, release the tension (preferably at the tack) then rig your boat, sheet the main on firm and pull the traveller right out, adjust the slack out of the shroud, run the travrller to the other side and adjust other shroud, then adjust tension on luff of jib (just enough to remove horizontal wrinkles).

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Thanks Darcy, let me try and explain the jib problem as best I can, but I don't understand all the proper terms as yet.

The 2" (or there abouts) curl I get is at the leading edge of the jib. It doesn't run verticaly up the jib. Rather it runs horizontally to the side of the leading edge, and obviously changes sides with each tack.

So the problem is, rather than developing an aerofoil that has a nice clean leading edge pointing into the breeze, I have this odd looking 2" curl at the front of the jib, that effectively gives the jib a 2" wide leading edge. I'm damn near certain this is what makes the jib "flap" at the trailing edge badly when the breeze gets stronger.

As a result of the curl, I can't achieve good air flow across the jib sailing upwind, because the first few inches of the jib stick out horizontally from the stay wire, and the only way I can really flatten the sail is to pull the jib on really tight, which then chokes the slot between the jib and main.

If I ease the jib slightly it takes on a more uniform aerofoil contour, except for the last few inches at the front edge, but then flaps madly at the trailing edge. I've tried all the different adjustment postions on the side of the boat, but have the same problem regardless of what position I pull on the jib from.

I think Warbirds suggestion that the stay wire may be tight enough, but the jib might be a bit loose on the stay wire, may be part of the problem, but I'd welcome and appreciate any feedback.

Cheers

Barry

[This message has been edited by BarryK1200LT (edited 22 August 2007).]

[This message has been edited by BarryK1200LT (edited 22 August 2007).]

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  • 3 weeks later...

ZAX also runs a zippered jib, that was after advice from Graham (Exodus) when I first wanted to sail sloop. I leave the mast up when the boat is down the front so having a zippered jib lets me take the jib off the boat and still leave the mast up.

I sounds like your jib is twisted on the front stay or furler not releasing enough, also seems you need tosheet your jib further forward to tighten the leach. I have 2 jibs, one has a leach line which would also stop the leach flapping.

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