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Alpha omega repair?


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I have a 10 cent sized 'pimple' in the gelcoat just under the port chainplate on my AO. There are no obvious signs of cracking or delamination inside the hull. If you look at the image you can seen the square shape of the built-up area inside the hull.

Suggestions for repairs?

What do you recommend to ensure a good waterproof seal when reinstalling the deck covers.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/36935876@N02/3403392152/in/photostream/?rotated=1& cb=1238551081493

[This message has been edited by QB2 (edited 01 April 2009).]

[This message has been edited by QB2 (edited 02 April 2009).]

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The original material for joining the deck hatches to the hull was “Q cell” mixed with polyester resin to a “non slump” consistency. If you remove all the old Q cell from the hatch and the hull, sand both the deck and the hull where the join was, then wipe both down with acetone, mask off the hull around the outside of the join to stop any excess Q cell sticking to it (and also giving yourself an optical position for positioning the deck back into place) you can also mask off the outside of the deck hatch as well, then apply the new Q cell mix to the underside of the deck hatch. Place the deck hatch into position onto the hull and fix it down onto the hull using masking tape (1/2” wide tape) across from one side of the hull over the hatch onto the other side of the hull while pushing down on the deck hatch to bed the deck close to the hull. Tape it down at regular spacings of approx’ 2” spacings. When the Q cell has “gelled” (not fully hardened but still firm yet a little “rubbery”) remove the tape and clean off any excess Q cell that has squeezed out from between the deck hatch and the hull join. This will return the join to “as new”.

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I have just viewed your photos and it is very difficult to form any opinion as to what has caused it from them. Off hand I would say that to conduct a repair I would sand back the “bulge” (whatever it is?) from the outside of the hull and treat it like any repair IE sand back to the form a slight hollow, apply glass and resin to the area, fair it back, gel coat, fair back and cut and polish to finish. That particular area on the AO’s is very strongly built with an insert of aluminium plate glassed into the hull on the inside to support the chainplate loads.

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Thanks very much Darryl, I emailed you but got a message back there was no such address. (ao14@optusnet.com.au)

I hope to get into epairing the

'bulge' and other hull dings this weekend if the rain stops.

One thing I found with the deck covers off is I still have about a litre of water in the port hull even after lifting the cat as high as I can on the trailer. The hulls also fill up in the rain so I still have a leak or two somewhere. Where would you suggest I put in an inspection hatch?

Mark

[This message has been edited by QB2 (edited 04 April 2009).]

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Apart from a few early AO 4.4’s which were fitted only with “bungs” we dispensed with the bungs (the quickest way to fill up a cat with water is to forget the bungs) and fitted a hatch on the inside of each hull between the rear beam and the transom with the top of the hatch approx’ 50mm down from the deck line. This enables any water (should only ever be a small amount) to be sponged out of the hull. To search for any leaks there should be a “breather” hole (approx 1/8” diameter) in the deck of each hull, in the middle of the deck, usually just behind the rear beam or just behind the centre/main beam. Close the bungs then with your mouth over this breather hole blow into the hull. Have someone else going around the hull while you do this and they can generally hear even a tiny pinprick hole whistling. The amount of leaks and their size will depend on how hard it is to blow up pressure in the hull IE the easier to blow the more or larger the leak(s) the harder to blow the smaller or less the leaks.

My email address is stil

ao14@optusnet.com.au

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Apart from a few early AO 4.4’s which were fitted only with “bungs” we dispensed with the bungs (the quickest way to fill up a cat with water is to forget the bungs) and fitted a hatch on the inside of each hull between the rear beam and the transom with the top of the hatch approx’ 50mm down from the deck line. This enables any water (should only ever be a small amount) to be sponged out of the hull. To search for any leaks there should be a “breather” hole (approx 1/8” diameter) in the deck of each hull, in the middle of the deck, usually just behind the rear beam or just behind the centre/main beam. Close the bungs then with your mouth over this breather hole blow into the hull. Have someone else going around the hull while you do this and they can generally hear even a tiny pinprick hole whistling. The amount of leaks and their size will depend on how hard it is to blow up pressure in the hull IE the easier to blow the more or larger the leak(s) the harder to blow the smaller or less the leaks.

My email address is stil

ao14@optusnet.com.au

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