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Cat rigged Windy


Gazereth78
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Gazereth they are hard to tack, but after you swing let your main off a bit till the boat is around, then pull on a bit untill she is under way and dont keep your rudders on tight turn as it stops the boat starting off, bout half turn after your around!!! still will take some practice, but hope this helps u.

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Hi All

Its all good theory fellas, however i think lots of time on the water is needed. I just wanted to give it a go, My old man has a windy with out a jib. I know the idea

but the practice is rough. I thought i should give it a go so i can teach him better. I was only on the water about 15 minutes and broke the bracket from the main sheet to the boom. That ended the session...

Cheers see ya on the water.

BTW who sails windys in WA on the forum?

Gazereth78

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When you put a vang bracket on , depending on the brand you buy , be mindful of where your rivet holes go and how many you put in , especially if its near the old holes under the boom as lots holes will eventually weaken the boom to a breaking point . (I know this from experiance) .

I am in the West - Albany.

Rgds

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I gave it a run cat rigged and yes found it harder to tack as well. I found the trick was to make the tack as smooth and fluid as possible, don't just dig in with the rudders. I think that body position was important as well, don't have the stern weighed down. I sail with my 10yr old and had either him or myself already on the leeward hull ready for the turn thru the wind.

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A catboat, or a cat-rigged sailboat, is a sailing vessel characterized by a single mast carried well forward. Although any boat with a single sail and a mast carried well forward is 'technically' a catboat, the traditional catboat has a wide beam approximately half the length of the boat, a centreboard, and a single gaff-rigged sail.

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  • 1 month later...

Sailing cats efficiently as all about 'flow' - flow around the sail, flow around the rudders - around the hulls – you have to get into the right mindset...

Unless the seas and wind conditions are overpowering - any rough and jerky movements will STOP the boat in its tracks - which is particularly true of tacking...

Weight placement is critical too - I see far too may novices burying the sterns and disrupting the flow...

You need to time your tack correctly too - when the waves or swell is favorable - especially in overpowering conditions.

I rarely fluff a tack now - even cat-rigged the boat can be tacked as fast as any monohull with 28ft of waterline – if you get it right...

I find that when the wind is stonking and waves are high, 'crash-tacking' is the best option - be BRUTAL - slam the boat over, reverse (3-point turn) if necessary and then haul on the main - sometimes pumping it to get going again... and remember - extreme downhaul tension is needed - without it it the sail will stall very quickly and impede the tacking process...

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Sheet the main in really tight as you push the rudders over gently, fast steering movement = stopping before you even get into the wind. You will only need about 1/2 steering lock initially but then as you get mid tack turn to full lock and release the main in a quick motion. This will make the boat almost pop through the tack . All the time keeping the weight up by the stay. Once you do the quick release of the main move back and across to the opposite rear corner of the tramp and keep the rudders partly over and then you should be easing away on the new tack with the main pretty eased. Now sheet on and move fwd to the stay again and you are away on the new tack.

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Can I ask the reason you want to sail cat rigged?

Sailing sloop-rigged without a trapeze is really 'cheating'... it's really 'purer' to sail cat-rigged if sailing 1-up. You need to be more 'in tune' if sailing cat-rigged, as the jib can always get you round without you really trying...

Super-sloops are a different matter - and the trapeze helps to keep the boat flat when over-powered...

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Hey DrSnapid

Sailing Cat Rigged is a bit more challenging. My Father has a Catrigged Windy and I thought the best way to teach him was to do it myself. However i have a furling headsail which acts as a brake in front of the boat. When i get my new sails i will have a boat that i can convert into sloop or cat.

Cheers Gazereth

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Thx guys. I have sailed mine without the jib (broken jib strop) although personally i don't call it cat rigged. My interpretation of cat rigged means stepping the mast further forward and using a longer mainsail. But anyway i seem to recall it sailed fine but yes tacking requires more finesse

I like your point about more time sailing especially...

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Hey DrSnapid

Sailing Cat Rigged is a bit more challenging. My Father has a Catrigged Windy and I thought the best way to teach him was to do it myself. However i have a furling headsail which acts as a brake in front of the boat. When i get my new sails i will have a boat that i can convert into sloop or cat.

Cheers Gazereth

So you will use a different mainsail when cat rigged? Not your usual main just without the jib?

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Hey Doc

No the main is the same, just leave off the jib. It makes the boat cleaner and less complicated. My Father needs to get his head around two things (steering and mainsheet) before i add a third. Having said that i will sail Supersloop mainly, i just want to get the dynamics of the boat down in all sailing setups. I had a blast off JBSC beaches yesterday, supersloop hanging out on the wire. Absolutly brilliant, best fun on the water. Cheers Seabreeze it was a great sail.

Gazereth

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Onya Gaz

I'm still learning the lingo myself... so, um... what do you guys mean when you say super sloop? Main, jib and something else? Doesnt main and jib mean sloop? So whats the super mean? I see lots of people on here referring to rigging super sloop, but I havet figured out what they mean.

15 years away from sailing and i'm like a grandpa at a playstation launch...

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